Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19689
Title: Superior Memory Reduces 8-year Risk of Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia But Not Amyloid β-Associated Cognitive Decline in Older Adults.
Authors: Dang, Christa;Harrington, Karra D;Lim, Yen Ying;Ames, David;Hassenstab, Jason;Laws, Simon M;Yassi, Nawaf;Hickey, Martha;Rainey-Smith, Stephanie R;Robertson, Joanne;Rowe, Christopher C;Sohrabi, Hamid R;Salvado, Olivier;Weinborn, Michael;Villemagne, Victor L;Masters, Colin L;Maruff, Paul
Affiliation: CogState Ltd., Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
CSIRO Health and Biosecurity, the Australian eHealth Research Centre, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
School of Psychological Science, University of Western Australia, Crawley, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Obstetrics and Gynaecology, Melbourne Medical School, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
The Florey Institute, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Cooperative Research Centre for Mental Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
National Ageing Research Institute, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Charles F. and Joanne Knight Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Department of Neurology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO, USA
Department of Psychological & Brain Sciences, Washington University, St. Louis, MO, USA
Collaborative Genomics Group, Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Exercise, Biomedical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
School of Biomedical Sciences, Faculty of Health Sciences, Curtin Health Innovation Research Institute, Curtin University, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Medicine and Neurology, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Medical and Health Sciences, Edith Cowan University, Joondalup, Western Australia, Australia
Australian Alzheimer's Research Foundation, Ralph and Patricia Sarich Neuroscience Research Institute, Nedlands, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Molecular Imaging and Therapy, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Biomedical Sciences, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
Issue Date: 1-Oct-2018
EDate: 2018-10-01
Citation: Archives of clinical neuropsychology : the official journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists 2018; online first: 1 October
Abstract: To prospectively examine 8-year risk of clinical disease progression to mild cognitive impairment (MCI)/dementia in older adults ≥60 with superior episodic memory (SuperAgers) compared to those cognitively normal for their age (CNFA). Additionally, to determine the extent to which SuperAgers were resilient to the negative effects of elevated amyloid-beta (Aβ+) on cognition. Participants were classified as SuperAgers based on episodic memory performance consistent with younger adults aged 30-44 and no impairment on non-memory tests (n = 179), and were matched with CNFA on age, sex, education, and follow-up time (n = 179). Subdistribution hazard models examined risk of clinical progression to MCI/dementia. Linear mixed models assessed the effect of Aβ on cognition over time. Prevalence of Aβ+ and APOE ε4 was equivalent between SuperAgers and CNFA. SuperAgers had 69%-73% reduced risk of clinical progression to MCI/dementia compared to CNFA (HR: 0.27-0.31, 95% CI: 0.11-0.73, p < .001). Aβ+ was associated with cognitive decline in verbal memory and executive function, regardless of SuperAger/CNFA classification. In the absence of Aβ+, equivalent age-related changes in cognition were observed between SuperAgers and CNFA. SuperAgers displayed resilience against clinical progression to MCI/dementia compared to CNFA despite equivalent risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD); however, SuperAgers had no greater protection from Aβ+ than CNFA. The deleterious effects of Aβ on cognition persist regardless of baseline cognitive ability. Thus, superior cognitive performance does not reflect resistance against the neuropathological processes associated with AD, and the observed resilience for SuperAgers may instead reflect neuropsychological criteria for cognitive impairment.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19689
DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acy078
ORCID: 0000-0003-3910-2453
PubMed URL: 30272115
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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