Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19663
Title: Functional network connectivity is altered in patients with upper limb somatosensory impairments in the acute phase post stroke: A cross-sectional study.
Authors: De Bruyn, Nele;Meyer, Sarah;Kessner, Simon S;Essers, Bea;Cheng, Bastian;Thomalla, Götz;Peeters, Andre;Sunaert, Stefan;Duprez, Thierry;Thijs, Vincent N;Feys, Hilde;Alaerts, Kaat;Verheyden, Geert
Affiliation: Department of Neurology, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
University Hospitals Leuven, Department of Radiology, Leuven, Belgium
Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Radiology, Brussels, Belgium
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Rehabilitation Sciences, Leuven, Belgium
University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Department of Neurology, Hamburg, Germany
Cliniques Universitaires Saint-Luc, Department of Neurology, Brussels, Belgium
KU Leuven-University of Leuven, Department of Imaging and Pathology, Leuven, Belgium
Issue Date: 12-Oct-2018
EDate: 2018-10-12
Citation: PloS one 2018; 13(10): e0205693
Abstract: Aberrant functional connectivity in brain networks associated with motor impairment after stroke is well described, but little is known about the association with somatosensory impairments. The objective of this cross-sectional observational study was to investigate the relationship between brain functional connectivity and severity of somatosensory impairments in the upper limb in the acute phase post stroke. Nineteen first-ever stroke patients underwent resting-state functional magnetic resonance imaging (rs-fMRI) and a standardized clinical somatosensory profile assessment (exteroception and higher cortical somatosensation) in the first week post stroke. Integrity of inter- and intrahemispheric (ipsilesional and contralesional) functional connectivity of the somatosensory network was assessed between patients with severe (Em-NSA< 13/32) and mild to moderate (Em-NSA> 13/32) somatosensory impairments. Patients with severe somatosensory impairments displayed significantly lower functional connectivity indices in terms of interhemispheric (p = 0.001) and ipsilesional intrahemispheric (p = 0.035) connectivity compared to mildly to moderately impaired patients. Significant associations were found between the perceptual threshold of touch assessment and interhemispheric (r = -0.63) and ipsilesional (r = -0.51) network indices. Additional significant associations were found between the index of interhemispheric connectivity and light touch (r = 0.55) and stereognosis (r = 0.64) evaluation. Patients with more severe somatosensory impairments have lower inter- and ipsilesional intrahemispheric connectivity of the somatosensory network. Lower connectivity indices are related to more impaired exteroception and higher cortical somatosensation. This study highlights the importance of network integrity in terms of inter- and ipsilesional intrahemispheric connectivity for somatosensory function. Further research is needed investigating the effect of therapy on the re-establishment of these networks.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19663
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0205693
ORCID: 0000-0002-8011-1303
0000-0002-6614-8417
PubMed URL: 30312350
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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