Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19374
Title: Predictors of return to work in survivors of critical illness.
Authors: Hodgson, Carol L;Haines, Kimberley J;Bailey, Michael;Barrett, Jonathan;Bellomo, Rinaldo;Bucknall, Tracey;Gabbe, Belinda J;Higgins, Alisa M;Iwashyna, Theodore J;Hunt-Smith, Julian;Murray, Lynne J;Myles, Paul S;Ponsford, Jennie;Pilcher, David;Udy, Andrew A;Walker, Craig;Young, Meredith;Jamie Cooper, D J
Affiliation: Australian and New Zealand Intensive Care Research Centre, Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
Western Health, St Albans, VIC, Australia
Monash Partners Advanced Health Research and Translation Centre, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Deakin University, Burwood, VIC, Australia
Department of Epidemiology and Preventive Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
The Alfred Hospital, Prahran, VIC, Australia
University of Michigan, MI, USA
Epworth Health, Richmond, VIC 3121, Australia
Farr Institute, Swansea University Medical School, Swansea University, UK
Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, VIC 3168, Australia
Issue Date: 13-Aug-2018
EDate: 2018-08-13
Citation: Journal of critical care 2018; 48: 21-25
Abstract: To determine predictors of inability to return to work due to health six-months after intensive care admission; and compare functional recovery between patients who had not returned to work and employed patients. Participants were working adults admitted to ICU who received >24 h of mechanical ventilation. Outcomes included inability to return to work due to health at six-months post-ICU admission, disability, health status, anxiety, depression and post-traumatic stress. Of 107 patients, 31 (29%) were unable to return to work due to health at six-months after ICU admission. Predictors of inability to return to work included longer hospital stay (odds ratio [OR], 1.05; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.02-1.08; P = .004); lower Glasgow Coma Scale (GCS) at admission (OR, 0.86; CI, 0.75-0.99; P = .03); and admission due to major trauma (OR, 8.83; CI, 2.57-30.38; P < .001). Compared to employed patients, those who had not returned to work reported higher levels of disability and psychological distress, and poorer health-related quality of life. Major trauma, lower GCS and increased hospital length of stay predicted inability to return to work due to health at six-months post-ICU admission. Compared to employed patients, those who had not returned to work reported poorer functional recovery.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19374
DOI: 10.1016/j.jcrc.2018.08.005
ORCID: 0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 30138904
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Disability
Intensive care
Long-term outcomes
Mechanical ventilation
Psychological outcomes
Return to work
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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