Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19365
Title: Stability of intravenous vitamin C solutions: a technical report.
Authors: Carr, Anitra;Wohlrab, Christina;Young, Paul;Bellomo, Rinaldo
Affiliation: Department of Pathology and Biomedical Science, University of Otago, Christchurch, New Zealand
Department of Intensive Care, Wellington Regional Hospital, Wellington, New Zealand
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Sep-2018
Citation: Critical care and resuscitation : journal of the Australasian Academy of Critical Care Medicine 2018; 20(3): 180-181
Abstract: There has recently been a surge of interest in intravenous (IV) vitamin C as a potential therapy in intensive care unit (ICU) patients, particularly in those with septic shock. Establishing the safety and efficacy of IV vitamin C therapy through rigorously conducted randomised controlled trials is a priority. A key logistical issue for such trials is to establish the stability of IV vitamin C solutions prepared for infusion ahead of time. Accordingly, we aimed to assess the stability of IV vitamin C solutions over time using doses of vitamin C from previous pilot trials. We used spectrophotometry to measure the concentration of vitamin C remaining in solutions of 1.5 g per 50 mL of 0.9% saline and 2.5 g per 50 mL of dextrose 5% in water (D5W) at 0, 1, 3, 6, 9, 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours after preparation. The concentration of vitamin C in these solutions over time was assessed at 4°C in the dark and at ambient temperature and light. The concentration of vitamin C in diluted solutions was essentially unchanged over a period of 24 hours, and decreased less than 10% by 96 hours both at 4°C in the dark and at ambient temperature and light. Our findings suggest that vitamin C solutions of 1.5 g per 50 mL of 0.9% saline and 2.5 g per 50 mL of D5W remain stable for up to 96 hours and do not need to be protected from light.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19365
ORCID: 0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 30153779
ISSN: 1441-2772
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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