Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19253
Title: Tasks completed by nursing members of a teaching hospital Medical Emergency Team.
Authors: Topple, Michelle;Ryan, Brooke;Baldwin, Ian C;McKay, Richard;Blythe, Damien;Rogan, John;Radford, Samuel T;Jones, Daryl A
Affiliation: Department of Intensive Care Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Intensive Care Unit, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Feb-2016
EDate: 2015
Citation: Intensive & critical care nursing 2016-02; 32: 12-9
Abstract: To assess tasks completed by intensive care medical emergency team nurses. Prospective observational study. Australian teaching hospital. Nursing-related technical and non-technical tasks and level of self-reported confidence and competence. Amongst 400 calls, triggers and nursing tasks were captured in 93.5% and 77.3% of cases, respectively. The median patient age was 73 years. The four most common triggers were hypotension (22.0%), tachycardia (21.1%), low SpO2 (17.4%), and altered conscious state (10.1%). Non-technical skills included investigation review (33.7%), history acquisition (18.4%), contribution to the management plan (40.5%) and explanation to bedside nurses (78.3%), doctors (13.6%), allied health (3.9%) or patient/relative (39.5%). Technical tasks included examining the circulation (32%), conscious state (29.4%), and chest (26.5%). Additional tasks included adjusting oxygen (23.9%), humidification (8.4%), non-invasive ventilation (6.5%), performing an ECG (22%), and administrating fluid as a bolus (17.5%) or maintenance (16, 5.2%), or medication as a statim dose (16.8%) or infusion (5.2%). Self-reported competence and confidence appeared to be high overall amongst our MET nurses. Our findings provide important information on the tasks completed by Medical Emergency Team nurses and will guide future training.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19253
DOI: 10.1016/j.iccn.2015.08.008
PubMed URL: 26604041
Type: Journal Article
Observational Study
Subjects: Medical Emergency Team
Nurse education
Rapid Response System
Rapid Response Team
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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