Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19239
Title: Subjective memory decline predicts greater rates of clinical progression in preclinical Alzheimer's disease.
Authors: Buckley, Rachel F;Maruff, Paul;Ames, David;Bourgeat, Pierrick;Martins, Ralph N;Masters, Colin L;Rainey-Smith, Stephanie;Lautenschlager, Nicola;Rowe, Christopher C;Savage, Greg;Villemagne, Victor L;Ellis, Kathryn A
Affiliation: ARC Centre of Excellence in Cognition and its Disorders, Macquarie University, Sydney, Australia
The Australian eHealth Research Centre, CSIRO Health & Biosecurity Flagship, QLD, Australia
School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and West Australian Centre for Health & Ageing, University of Western Australia
The Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, St. Vincent's Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne
Cogstate Ltd, Melbourne, Australia
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
Sir James McCusker Alzheimer's Disease Research Unit (Hollywood Private Hospital), Perth, WA, Australia
School of Psychiatry and Clinical Neurosciences and West Australian Centre for Health & Ageing, University of Western Australia
Centre of Excellence for Alzheimer's Disease Research and Care, School of Medical Sciences, Edith Cowan University, WA, Australia
Department of Medicine, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia
The Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, St. Vincent's Health, Department of Psychiatry, University of Melbourne
Issue Date: Jul-2016
EDate: 2016-02-04
Citation: Alzheimer's & dementia : the journal of the Alzheimer's Association 2016; 12(7): 796-804
Abstract: The objective of this study was to determine the utility of subjective memory decline (SMD) to predict episodic memory change and rates of clinical progression in cognitively normal older adults with evidence of high β-amyloid burden (CN Aβ+). Fifty-eight CN Aβ+ participants from the Australian Imaging, Biomarkers, and Lifestyle study responded to an SMD questionnaire and underwent comprehensive neuropsychological assessments. Participant data for three follow-up assessments were analyzed. In CN Aβ+, subjects with high SMD did not exhibit significantly greater episodic memory decline than those with low SMD. High SMD was related to greater rates of progression to mild cognitive impairment or Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia (hazard ratio = 5.1; 95% confidence interval, 1.4-20.0, P = .02) compared with low SMD. High SMD was associated with greater depressive symptomatology and smaller left hippocampal volume. High SMD is a harbinger of greater rates of clinical progression in preclinical AD. Although SMD reflects broader diagnostic implications for CN Aβ+, more sensitive measures may be required to detect early subtle cognitive change.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/19239
DOI: 10.1016/j.jalz.2015.12.013
ORCID: 0000-0003-3910-2453
PubMed URL: 26852195
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subjects: Amyloid
PET imaging
Preclinical AD
Prodromal AD
Subjective cognitive decline
Subjective memory decline cognitively normal older adults
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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