Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18799
Title: Review article: Sepsis in the emergency department - Part 1: Definitions and outcomes.
Authors: Macdonald, Stephen Pj;Williams, Julian M;Shetty, Amith;Bellomo, Rinaldo;Finfer, Simon;Shapiro, Nathan;Keijzers, Gerben
Affiliation: Centre for Clinical Research in Emergency Medicine, Harry Perkins Institute of Medical Research, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Division of Emergency Medicine, The University of Western Australia, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, The University of Queensland, Brisbane, Queensland, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Centre for Research in Critical Infection, Westmead Millennium Institute, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Intensive Care, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
School of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
The George Institute for Global Health, The University of New South Wales, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Intensive Care, Royal North Shore Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Emergency Medicine, Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Centre, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts, USA
Department of Emergency Medicine, Gold Coast University Hospital, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
School of Medicine, Bond University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
School of Medicine, Griffith University, Gold Coast, Queensland, Australia
Issue Date: Dec-2017
EDate: 2017-11-02
Citation: Emergency medicine Australasia : EMA 2017; 29(6): 619-625
Abstract: Sepsis has recently been redefined as acute organ dysfunction due to infection. The ED plays a critical role in identifying patients with sepsis. This is challenging due to the heterogeneity of the syndrome, and the lack of an objective standard diagnostic test. While overall mortality rates from sepsis appear to be falling, there is an increasing burden of morbidity among survivors. This largely reflects the growing proportion of older patients with comorbid illnesses among those treated for sepsis.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18799
DOI: 10.1111/1742-6723.12886
ORCID: 0000-0001-9921-4620
0000-0001-7349-1128
0000-0002-1650-8939
PubMed URL: 29094474
Type: Journal Article
Review
Subjects: emergency service
hospital
sepsis
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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