Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18623
Title: High risk of near-crash driving events following night-shift work.
Authors: Lee, Michael L;Howard, Mark E;Horrey, William J;Liang, Yulan;Anderson, Clare;Shreeve, Michael S;O'Brien, Conor S;Czeisler, Charles A
Affiliation: Division of Sleep and Circadian Disorders, Departments of Medicine and Neurology, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA 02115
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Division of Sleep Medicine, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02115
Center for Behavioral Sciences, Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety, Hopkinton, MA 01748
Monash Institute of Cognitive and Clinical Neurosciences, School of Psychological Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, VIC 3800, Australia
Issue Date: 5-Jan-2016
EDate: 2015-12-22
Citation: Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America 2016; 113(1): 176-181
Abstract: Night-shift workers are at high risk of drowsiness-related motor vehicle crashes as a result of circadian disruption and sleep restriction. However, the impact of actual night-shift work on measures of drowsiness and driving performance while operating a real motor vehicle remains unknown. Sixteen night-shift workers completed two 2-h daytime driving sessions on a closed driving track at the Liberty Mutual Research Institute for Safety: (i) a postsleep baseline driving session after an average of 7.6 ± 2.4 h sleep the previous night with no night-shift work, and (ii) a postnight-shift driving session following night-shift work. Physiological measures of drowsiness were collected, including infrared reflectance oculography, electroencephalography, and electrooculography. Driving performance measures included lane excursions, near-crash events, and drives terminated because of failure to maintain control of the vehicle. Eleven near-crashes occurred in 6 of 16 postnight-shift drives (37.5%), and 7 of 16 postnight-shift drives (43.8%) were terminated early for safety reasons, compared with zero near-crashes or early drive terminations during 16 postsleep drives (Fishers exact: P = 0.0088 and P = 0.0034, respectively). Participants had a significantly higher rate of lane excursions, average Johns Drowsiness Scale, blink duration, and number of slow eye movements during postnight-shift drives compared with postsleep drives (3.09/min vs. 1.49/min; 1.71 vs. 0.97; 125 ms vs. 100 ms; 35.8 vs. 19.1; respectively, P < 0.05 for all). Night-shift work increases driver drowsiness, degrading driving performance and increasing the risk of near-crash drive events. With more than 9.5 million Americans working overnight or rotating shifts and one-third of United States commutes exceeding 30 min, these results have implications for traffic and occupational safety.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18623
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.1510383112
PubMed URL: 26699470
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, N.I.H., Extramural
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Research Support, U.S. Gov't, Non-P.H.S.
Subjects: EEG
drowsy driving
fatigue
infrared oculography
sleep
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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