Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18580
Title: Nephrologists' management of patient medications in kidney transplantation: results of an online survey.
Authors: Crawford, Kimberley;Low, Jac Kee;Manias, Elizabeth;Walker, Rowan;Toussaint, Nigel D;Mulley, William;Dooley, Michael;Ierino, Francesco L;Hughes, Peter;Goodman, David J;Williams, Allison
Affiliation: Nephrology Department, St Vincent's Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Pharmacy Department, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Centre for Medicine Use and Safety, Faculty of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Faculty of Medicine, Nursing and Health Sciences, School of Nursing and Midwifery, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
School of Nursing and Midwifery, Deakin University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Melbourne School of Health Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Monash University, Alfred Hospital, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Nephrology, The Royal Melbourne Hospital, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine (RMH), The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia
Nephrology Department, Monash Medical Centre, Clayton, Victoria, Australia
Department of Nephrology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Oct-2015
EDate: 2015-06-17
Citation: Journal of evaluation in clinical practice 2015; 21(5): 879-885
Abstract: Medication adherence is essential in kidney transplant recipients to reduce the risk of rejection and subsequent allograft loss. The aim of this study was to delineate what 'usual care' entails, in relation to medication management, for adult kidney transplant recipients. An online survey was developed to explore how nephrologists promote and assess medication adherence, the management of prescriptions, the frequency of clinic appointments and the frequency of clinical screening tests. Nephrologists from all acute kidney transplant units in Victoria, Australia, were invited to participate. Data were collected between May and June 2014. Of 60 nephrologists invited to participate, 22 completed the survey (response rate of 36.6%). Respondents had a mean age of 49.1 ± 10.1 years, with a mean of 20.1 ± 9.9 years working in nephrology and 14 were men. Descriptive analysis of responses showed that nephrologists performed frequent screening for kidney graft dysfunction that may indicate medication non-adherence, maintained regular transplant clinic visits with patients and emphasized the importance of medication education. However, time constraints during consultations impacted on extensive patient education and the long-term medication follow-up support was often delivered by the renal transplant nurse coordinator or pharmacist. This study highlighted that nephrologists took an active approach in the medication management of kidney transplant recipients, which may assist with facilitating long-term graft survival. Ultimately, promoting medication adherence needs to be patient centred, involving an interdisciplinary team of nephrologists, pharmacists and renal transplant nurse coordinators, working together with the patient to establish optimal adherence.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18580
DOI: 10.1111/jep.12394
PubMed URL: 26371625
Type: Journal Article
Research Support, Non-U.S. Gov't
Subjects: health care
kidney transplantation
medication adherence
person-centred medicine
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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