Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18057
Title: Resting-state functional brain networks in first-episode psychosis: A 12-month follow-up study.
Authors: Ganella, Eleni P;Seguin, Caio;Pantelis, Christos;Whittle, Sarah;Baune, Bernhard T;Olver, James S;Amminger, G Paul;McGorry, Patrick D;Cropley, Vanessa;Zalesky, Andrew;Bartholomeusz, Cali F
Affiliation: Melbourne Neuropsychiatry Centre, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Carlton South, VIC, Australia
Orygen, The National Centre of Excellence in Youth Mental Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia
The Centre for Youth Mental Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, VIC, Australia
The Cooperative Research Centre (CRC) for Mental Health, Carlton South, VIC, Australia
NorthWestern Mental Health, Melbourne Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia
The Florey Institute of Neurosciences & Mental Health, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Centre for Neural Engineering, Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Carlton South, VIC, Australia
Melbourne School of Engineering, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia..
Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia
Discipline of Psychiatry, The University of Adelaide, Adelaide, SA, Australia
Department of Psychiatry, Austin Health, The University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 1-May-2018
EDate: 2018-05-01
Citation: The Australian and New Zealand journal of psychiatry 2018: 4867418775833
Abstract: Schizophrenia is increasingly conceived as a disorder of brain network connectivity and organization. However, reports of network abnormalities during the early illness stage of psychosis are mixed. This study adopted a data-driven whole-brain approach to investigate functional connectivity and network architecture in a first-episode psychosis cohort relative to healthy controls and whether functional network properties changed abnormally over a 12-month period in first-episode psychosis. Resting-state functional connectivity was performed at two time points. At baseline, 29 first-episode psychosis individuals and 30 healthy controls were assessed, and at 12 months, 14 first-episode psychosis individuals and 20 healthy controls completed follow-up. Whole-brain resting-state functional connectivity networks were mapped for each individual and analyzed using graph theory to investigate whether network abnormalities associated with first-episode psychosis were evident and whether functional network properties changed abnormally over 12 months relative to controls. This study found no evidence of abnormal resting-state functional connectivity or topology in first-episode psychosis individuals relative to healthy controls at baseline or at 12-months follow-up. Furthermore, longitudinal changes in network properties over a 12-month period did not significantly differ between first-episode psychosis individuals and healthy control. Network measures did not significantly correlate with symptomatology, duration of illness or antipsychotic medication. This is the first study to show unaffected resting-state functional connectivity and topology in the early psychosis stage of illness. In light of previous literature, this suggests that a subgroup of first-episode psychosis individuals who have a neurotypical resting-state functional connectivity and topology may exist. Our preliminary longitudinal analyses indicate that there also does not appear to be deterioration in these network properties over a 12-month period. Future research in a larger sample is necessary to confirm our longitudinal findings.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/18057
DOI: 10.1177/0004867418775833
PubMed URL: 29806483
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Resting state
first episode of psychosis
functional connectivity
graph theory
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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