Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17458
Title: Acceptability and validity of a home exercise diary used in home-based pulmonary rehabilitation: A secondary analysis of a randomised controlled trial.
Authors: Lahham, Aroub;McDonald, Christine F;Mahal, Ajay;Lee, Annemarie L;Hill, Catherine J;Burge, Angela T;Cox, Narelle S;Moore, Rosemary;Nicolson, Caroline;O'halloran, Paul;Gillies, Rebecca;Holland, Anne E
Affiliation: Department of Physiotherapy, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Respiratory and Sleep Medicine, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Nossal Institute of Global Health, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Alfred Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Physiotherapy, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
School of Psychology and Public Health, La Trobe University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: 2-Feb-2018
EDate: 2018
Citation: The clinical respiratory journal 2018; online first: 2 February
Abstract: Evaluating adherence to home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) could be challenging due to lack of direct supervision and the complex nature of the rehabilitation model. To measure adherence to home-based PR in the HomeBase trial, participants were encouraged to work towards a goal of at least 30 min of whole-body exercise on most days of the week and report their participation using a home exercise diary. This project aimed to evaluate the acceptability and validity of the home exercise diary. Diary return and completion rates assessed acceptability of the home exercise diary. Home participants underwent physical activity (PA) monitoring using the Sensewear armband during the final week of an 8-week PR. The correlation between self-documented and objective daily exercise minutes was calculated. Objective exercise minutes were defined as bouts of ≥10 min spent in ≥ moderate PA. Differences in self-documented weekly exercise minutes between sufficiently active (≥7000 daily steps) and inactive participants were computed. Diaries were returned by 92% of programme completers. Of those who returned diaries, 72% have completed exercise documentation. Fifteen programme completers underwent PA monitoring [mean age 69 (9) (SD) years, FEV1 55 (19) %predicted]. A moderate correlation was observed between self-documented and objective mean daily exercise minutes (r = .59, P = .02). Active participants [n = 6, 10 253 (1521) daily steps] documented more exercise (111 min) during week eight compared with inactive participants [n = 9, 2705 (1772) daily steps, P = .002]. The self-documented home exercise diary is an acceptable and valid method to reflect exercise participation during home-based PR.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17458
DOI: 10.1111/crj.12773
ORCID: 0000-0003-2090-0746
0000-0001-6481-3391
PubMed URL: 29392881
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: motivational interviewing
physical activity
pulmonary disease, chronic obstructive
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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