Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17360
Title: Long-term efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil therapy in diffuse scleroderma skin disease.
Authors: Boulos, Daniel;Ngian, Gene-Siew;Rajadurai, Anton;Elford, Kathleen;Stevens, Wendy;Proudman, Susanna;Owen, Claire;Roddy, Janet;Nikpour, Mandana;Youssef, Peter;Hill, Catherine;Sahhar, Joanne
Affiliation: Department of Rheumatology, Monash Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, Royal Adelaide Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Discipline of Medicine, University of Adelaide, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia
Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, Royal Perth Hospital, Perth, Western Australia, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, St Vincent's Health, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, Royal Prince Alfred Hospital, Sydney, New South Wales, Australia
Department of Rheumatology, Queen Elizabeth Hospital, Adelaide, South Australia, Australia
Department of Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
Issue Date: Apr-2017
EDate: 2017
Citation: International journal of rheumatic diseases 2017; 20(4): 481-488
Abstract: To assess the long-term efficacy and tolerability of mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) in patients with diffuse cutaneous systemic sclerosis (dcSSc). Patients enrolled in the Australian Scleroderma Cohort study with dcSSc and baseline modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) ≥ 12 who were treated for a minimum of 12 months with MMF for the primary indication of skin disease were included and their prospectively collected data retrieved. Change in mRSS, the proportion with a clinically significant improvement (reduction in mRSS ≥ 5 from baseline) and adverse effects due to therapy were determined. Seventy-four participants treated with MMF were identified and of these, 42 met inclusion criteria. The mean age was 53 ± 12 years, with mean disease duration at MMF commencement of 4.8 ± 4.3 years. Twenty-one participants (50%) commenced MMF within 2 years of disease onset and the mean duration of therapy was 2.7 ± 1.7 years. The mean mRSS at baseline was 25.9 ± 9.2 with a reduction of 3.7 ± 7.1 (P = 0.07) after 1 year of therapy, 7.6 ± 8.3 after 2 years (P = 0.01) and 10.5 ± 10.3 after 5 years (P < 0.01). Response to treatment was not affected by disease duration at MMF commencement or baseline skin score. Eighteen participants (43%) demonstrated clinically significant improvement after 1 year, increasing to 92% after 4 years. Two participants (5%) ceased MMF due to adverse effects. MMF was associated with a modest improvement in mRSS and was well tolerated in the treatment of dcSSc. Given the natural history of dcSSc where skin involvement can spontaneously improve, randomized, placebo-controlled studies are required to confirm whether improvement can be attributed to MMF therapy.
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/17360
DOI: 10.1111/1756-185X.13035
PubMed URL: 28337853
Type: Journal Article
Multicenter Study
Observational Study
Subjects: diffuse
mycophenolate mofetil
scleroderma
systemic sclerosis
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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