Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13026
Title: Gal alpha(1,3)Gal is the major xenoepitope expressed on pig endothelial cells recognized by naturally occurring cytotoxic human antibodies.
Authors: Vaughan, Hilary A;Loveland, B E;Sandrin, Mauro S
Affiliation: Molecular Immunogenetics Laboratory, Austin Research Institute, Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: 27-Oct-1994
Citation: Transplantation; 58(8): 879-82
Abstract: Hyperacute rejection, mediated by natural antibody, is the major barrier to xenotransplantation. The studies reported herein were aimed at evaluating antibody-mediated cytotoxicity and the role of the Gal alpha(1,3)Gal epitope, which we had previously demonstrated was the major epitope of pig cells detected by naturally occurring human antibodies. Also, we had shown that this epitope could be induced in non-expressing cells by the transfection of a cDNA clone encoding alpha(1,3)galactosyl transferase, the enzyme that produces this epitope. The importance of the Gal alpha(1,3)Gal epitope was supported by (1) sugar inhibition studies; (2) complete absorption of cytotoxic antibodies by melibiose-sepharose columns; and (3) the ability of normal human serum to lyse COS cells after transfection with a cDNA clone encoding alpha(1,3)galactosyl transferase. These findings strongly suggest that the majority of cytotoxic human antibodies that would recognize a xenogeneic graft are directed to the Gal alpha(1,3)Gal epitope.
Internal ID Number: 7524207
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/13026
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/7524207
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Animals
Antibodies, Heterophile.immunology
Antibody-Dependent Cell Cytotoxicity
Cell Line
Epitopes.immunology
Galactosyltransferases.genetics.immunology
Graft Rejection.immunology
Humans
Immunoglobulin M.immunology
Swine
Transfection
Transplantation, Heterologous.immunology
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.