Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12673
Title: Classification of eating disorders: comparison of relative prevalence rates using DSM-IV and DSM-5 criteria.
Authors: Mancuso, Serafino G;Newton, J Richard;Bosanac, Peter;Rossell, Susan L;Nesci, Julian B;Castle, David Jonathan
Affiliation: Serafino G. Mancuso, PhD, St Vincent's Mental Health, Melbourne, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne and Centre for Excellence in Research Methods, Eastern Hill Academic Centre, Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne; J. Richard Newton, MBChB, MRCPsych, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Mental Health Clinical Service Unit, Austin Health, Melbourne and Department of Psychological Medicine, Monash University, Melbourne; Peter Bosanac, MD, FRANZCP, St Vincent's Mental Health, Melbourne and Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne; Susan L. Rossell, PhD, Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne and Psychological and Statistical Sciences, Faculty of Life and Social Sciences, Swinburne University of Technology, Melbourne; Julian B. Nesci, DPsych(Clin), St Vincent's Mental Health, Melbourne and Mental Health Clinical Service Unit, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia; David J. Castle, MD, MRCPsych, St Vincent's Mental Health, Melbourne and Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia.
Issue Date: 5-Mar-2015
Citation: The British Journal of Psychiatry : the Journal of Mental Science 2015; 206(6): 519-20
Abstract: DSM-5 contains substantial changes to eating disorder diagnoses. We examined relative prevalence rates of DSM-IV and DSM-5 eating disorder diagnoses using Eating Disorder Examination-Questionnaire diagnostic algorithms in 117 community out-patients. DSM-5 criteria produced a reduction in combined 'other specified feeding or eating disorder' and 'unspecified feeding or eating disorder' diagnoses from 46% to 29%, an increase in anorexia nervosa diagnoses from 35% to 47%, the same number of bulimia nervosa diagnoses and a 5% rate of binge eating disorder diagnoses.
Internal ID Number: 25745131
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12673
DOI: 10.1192/bjp.bp.113.143461
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25745131
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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