Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12670
Title: In-vitro activity of avermectins against Mycobacterium ulcerans.
Authors: Omansen, Till F;Porter, Jessica L;Johnson, Paul D R;van der Werf, Tjip S;Stienstra, Ymkje;Stinear, Timothy P
Affiliation: Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Microbiology and Immunology, The Peter Doherty Institute for Infection and Immunity, University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia; Austin Centre for Infection Research (ACIR), Infectious Diseases Department, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia; Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases, Groningen, The Netherlands; University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Pulmonary Diseases and Tuberculosis, Groningen, The Netherlands.
University of Groningen, University Medical Center Groningen, Department of Internal Medicine/Infectious Diseases, Groningen, The Netherlands.
Issue Date: 5-Mar-2015
Citation: Plos Neglected Tropical Diseases 2015; 9(3): e0003549
Abstract: Mycobacterium ulcerans causes Buruli ulcer (BU), a debilitating infection of subcutaneous tissue. There is a WHO-recommended antibiotic treatment requiring an 8-week course of streptomycin and rifampicin. This regime has revolutionized the treatment of BU but there are problems that include reliance on daily streptomycin injections and side effects such as ototoxicity. Trials of all-oral treatments for BU show promise but additional drug combinations that make BU treatment safer and shorter would be welcome. Following on from reports that avermectins have activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis, we tested the in-vitro efficacy of ivermectin and moxidectin on M. ulcerans. We observed minimum inhibitory concentrations of 4-8 μg/ml and time-kill assays using wild type and bioluminescent M. ulcerans showed a significant dose-dependent reduction in M. ulcerans viability over 8-weeks. A synergistic killing-effect with rifampicin was also observed. Avermectins are well tolerated, widely available and inexpensive. Based on our in vitro findings we suggest that avermectins should be further evaluated for the treatment of BU.
Internal ID Number: 25742173
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12670
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pntd.0003549
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25742173
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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