Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12611
Title: A meta-analysis of changes in brain activity in clinical depression.
Authors: Palmer, Susan M;Crewther, Sheila G;Carey, Leeanne M
Institutional Author: START Project Team
Affiliation: Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, Stroke Division, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre , Heidelberg, VIC , Australia.
Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, Stroke Division, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre , Heidelberg, VIC , Australia ; School of Psychological Science, La Trobe University , Bundoora, VIC , Australia.
Neurorehabilitation and Recovery, Stroke Division, The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre , Heidelberg, VIC , Australia ; Department of Occupational Therapy, School of Allied Health, La Trobe University , Bundoora, VIC , Australia.
Issue Date: 14-Jan-2015
Citation: Frontiers in Human Neuroscience 2015; 8(): 1045
Abstract: Insights into neurobiological mechanisms of depression are increasingly being sought via brain imaging studies. Our aim was to quantitatively summarize overlap and divergence in regions of altered brain activation associated with depression under emotionally valenced compared to cognitively demanding task conditions, and with reference to intrinsic functional connectivity. We hypothesized differences reflective of task demands. A co-ordinate-based meta-analysis technique, activation likelihood estimation, was used to analyze relevant imaging literature. These studies compared brain activity in depressed adults relative to healthy controls during three conditions: (i) emotionally valenced (cognitively easy) tasks (n = 29); (ii) cognitively demanding tasks (n = 15); and (iii) resting conditions (n = 21). The meta-analyses identified five, eight, and seven significant clusters of altered brain activity under emotion, cognition, and resting conditions, respectively, in depressed individuals compared to healthy controls. Regions of overlap and divergence between pairs of the three separate meta-analyses were quantified. There were no significant regions of overlap between emotion and cognition meta-analyses, but several divergent clusters were found. Cognitively demanding conditions were associated with greater activation of right medial frontal and insula regions while bilateral amygdala was more significantly altered during emotion (cognitively undemanding) conditions; consistent with task demands. Overlap was present in left amygdala and right subcallosal cingulate between emotion and resting meta-analyses, with no significant divergence. Our meta-analyses highlight alteration of common brain regions, during cognitively undemanding emotional tasks and resting conditions but divergence of regions between emotional and cognitively demanding tasks. Regions altered reflect current biological and system-level models of depression and highlight the relationship with task condition and difficulty.
Internal ID Number: 25642179
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12611
DOI: 10.3389/fnhum.2014.01045
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25642179
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: brain networks
cognition
depression
emotion
fMRI
meta-analysis
resting state
task activation
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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