Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12588
Title: Constructing Carbon Fiber Motion-Detection Loops for Simultaneous EEG-fMRI.
Authors: Abbott, David F;Masterton, Richard A J;Archer, John S;Fleming, Steven W;Warren, Aaron E L;Jackson, Graeme D
Affiliation: The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Austin Hospital , Melbourne, VIC , Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Austin Hospital , Melbourne, VIC , Australia ; The University of Melbourne , Melbourne, VIC , Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Austin Hospital , Melbourne, VIC , Australia ; The University of Melbourne , Melbourne, VIC , Australia ; Austin Hospital , Melbourne, VIC , Australia.
Issue Date: 5-Jan-2015
Citation: Frontiers in Neurology 2015; 5(): 260
Abstract: One of the most significant impediments to high-quality EEG recorded in an MRI scanner is subject motion. Availability of motion artifact sensors can substantially improve the quality of the recorded EEG. In the study of epilepsy, it can also dramatically increase the confidence that one has in discriminating true epileptiform activity from artifact. This is due both to the reduction in artifact and the ability to visually inspect the motion sensor signals when reading the EEG, revealing whether or not head motion is present. We have previously described the use of carbon fiber loops for detecting and correcting artifact in EEG acquired simultaneously with MRI. The loops, attached to the subject's head, are electrically insulated from the scalp. They provide a simple and direct measure of specific artifact that is contaminating the EEG, including both subject motion and residual artifact arising from magnetic field gradients applied during MRI. Our previous implementation was used together with a custom-built EEG-fMRI system that differs substantially from current commercially available EEG-fMRI systems. The present technical note extends this work, describing in more detail how to construct the carbon fiber motion-detection loops, and how to interface them with a commercially available simultaneous EEG-fMRI system. We hope that the information provided may help those wishing to utilize a motion-detection/correction solution to improve the quality of EEG recorded within an MRI scanner.
Internal ID Number: 25601852
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12588
DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2014.00260
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25601852
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: EEG–fMRI
artefact removal
artifact removal
cardioballistic artefact
cardioballistic artifact
gradient artefact
gradient artifact
motion detection
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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