Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12541
Title: Clinical and microbiological characteristics of Eggerthella lenta bacteremia.
Authors: Gardiner, B J;Tai, A Y;Kotsanas, D;Francis, M J;Roberts, S A;Ballard, Susan A;Junckerstorff, R K;Korman, Tony M
Affiliation: Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia bradgardiner@gmail.com.
Microbiology, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
Department of Microbiology, Auckland Hospital, Auckland, New Zealand.
Department of Infectious Diseases, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
Monash Infectious Diseases, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Microbiology, Monash Health, Clayton, Victoria, Australia Department of Medicine, Monash University, Clayton, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: 17-Dec-2014
Citation: Journal of Clinical Microbiology 2014; 53(2): 626-35
Abstract: Eggerthella lenta is an emerging pathogen that has been underrecognized due to historical difficulties with phenotypic identification. Until now, its pathogenicity, antimicrobial susceptibility profile, and optimal treatment have been poorly characterized. In this article, we report the largest cohort of patients with E. lenta bacteremia to date and describe in detail their clinical features, microbiologic characteristics, treatment, and outcomes. We identified 33 patients; the median age was 68 years, and there was no gender predominance. Twenty-seven patients (82%) had serious intra-abdominal pathology, often requiring a medical procedure. Of those who received antibiotics (28/33, 85%), the median duration of treatment was 21.5 days. Mortality from all causes was 6% at 7 days, 12% at 30 days, and 33% at 1 year. Of 26 isolates available for further testing, all were identified as E. lenta by both commercially available matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) systems, and none were found to harbor a vanA or vanB gene. Of 23 isolates which underwent susceptibility testing, all were susceptible to amoxicillin-clavulanate, cefoxitin, metronidazole, piperacillin-tazobactam, ertapenem, and meropenem, 91% were susceptible to clindamycin, 74% were susceptible to moxifloxacin, and 39% were susceptible to penicillin.
Internal ID Number: 25520446
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12541
DOI: 10.1128/JCM.02926-14
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25520446
Type: Journal Article
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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