Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12346
Title: The relationships between insomnia, sleep apnoea and depression: findings from the American National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2005-2008.
Authors: Hayley, Amie C;Williams, Lana J;Venugopal, Kamalesh;Kennedy, Gerard A;Berk, Michael;Pasco, Julie A
Affiliation: IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia Institute for Breathing and Sleep, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia achayley@deakin.edu.au.
IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia.
Department of Psychology, College of Arts, Victoria University, Melbourne, Australia.
IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia Department of Psychiatry, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Australia Orygen Research Centre, Parkville, Australia Florey Institute for Neuroscience and Mental Health, Parkville, Australia.
IMPACT Strategic Research Centre, School of Medicine, Deakin University, Geelong, Australia NorthWest Academic Centre, Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne, St Albans, Australia.
Issue Date: 15-Aug-2014
Citation: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 2014; 49(2): 156-70
Abstract: To determine the association between insomnia, obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA), and comorbid insomnia-OSA and depression, while controlling for relevant lifestyle and health factors, among a large population-based sample of US adults.We examined a sample of 11,329 adults (≥18 years) who participated in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) during the years 2005-2008. Insomnia was classified via a combination of self-reported positive physician diagnosis and high-frequency 'trouble falling asleep', 'waking during the night', 'waking too early', and 'feeling unrested during the day'. OSA was classified as a combination of a positive response to a physician-diagnosed condition, in addition to a high frequency of self-reported nocturnal 'snoring', 'snorting/stopping breathing' and 'feeling overly sleepy during the day'. Comorbid insomnia-OSA was further assessed by combining a positive response to either insomnia (all), or sleep apnoea (all), as classified above. Depressive symptomology was assessed by the Patient Health Questionnaire-9 (PHQ-9), with scores of >9 used to indicate depression. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for sleep disorders and depression were attained from logistic regression modelling adjusted for sex, age, poverty level, smoking status and body mass index (BMI).Those who reported insomnia, OSA or comorbid insomnia-OSA symptoms reported higher rates of depression (33.6%, 22.2%, 27.1%, respectively), and consistently reported poorer physical health outcomes than those who did not report sleep disorders. After adjusting for sex, age, poverty level, smoking status and BMI (kg/m(2)), insomnia (OR 6.57, 95% CI 3.89-11.11), OSA (OR 5.14, 95% CI 3.14-8.41) and comorbid insomnia-OSA (OR 6.67, 95% CI 4.44-10.00) were associated with an increased likelihood of reporting depression.Insomnia, OSA and comorbid insomnia-OSA are associated with significant depressive symptomology among this large population-based sample of adults.
Internal ID Number: 25128225
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12346
DOI: 10.1177/0004867414546700
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25128225
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Comorbidity
National Health and Nutritional Examination Survey (NHANES)
depression
epidemiology
insomnia
obstructive sleep apnoea
population
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.