Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12297
Title: Physical activity measured using global positioning system tracking in non-small cell lung cancer: an observational study.
Authors: Granger, Catherine L;Denehy, Linda;McDonald, Christine F;Irving, Louis;Clark, Ross A
Affiliation: The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia Melbourne Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia catherine.granger@unimelb.edu.au.
The University of Melbourne, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australia.
Melbourne Health, Parkville, Victoria, Australia.
Australian Catholic University, Fitzroy, Victoria, Australia.
Issue Date: 7-Jul-2014
Citation: Integrative Cancer Therapies 2014; 13(6): 482-92
Abstract: Increasingly physical activity (PA) is being recognized as an important outcome in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). We investigated PA using novel global positioning system (GPS) tracking individuals with NSCLC and a group of similar-aged healthy individuals.A prospective cross-sectional multicenter study. Fifty individuals with NSCLC from 3 Australian tertiary hospitals and 35 similar-aged healthy individuals without cancer were included. Individuals with NSCLC were assessed pretreatment. Primary measures were triaxial accelerometery (steps/day) and GPS tracking (outdoor PA behavior). Secondary measures were questionnaires assessing depression, motivation to exercise, and environmental barriers to PA. Between-group comparisons were analyzed using analysis of covariance.Individuals with NSCLC engaged in significantly less PA than similar-aged healthy individuals (mean difference 2363 steps/day, P = .007) and had higher levels of depression (P = .027) and lower motivation to exercise (P = .001). Daily outdoor walking time (P = .874) and distance travelled away from home (P = .883) were not different between groups. Individuals with NSCLC spent less time outdoors in their local neighborhood area (P < .001). A greater number of steps per day was seen in patients who were less depressed (r = .39) or had better access to nonresidential destinations such as shopping centers (r = .25).Global positioning system tracking appears to be a feasible methodology for adult cancer patients and holds promise for use in future studies investigating PA and or lifestyle behaviors.
Internal ID Number: 25006040
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12297
DOI: 10.1177/1534735414542484
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/25006040
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: exercise
global positioning system (GPS) tracking
lung cancer
outdoor behavior
physical activity
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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