Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12225
Title: Progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia: a 3-year longitudinal study.
Authors: Brodaty, Henry;Connors, Michael H;Ames, David;Woodward, Michael M
Institutional Author: PRIME study group
Affiliation: National Ageing Research Institute, Melbourne, Australia University of Melbourne Academic Unit for Psychiatry of Old Age, Melbourne, Australia
Dementia Collaborative Research Centre, School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia
Austin Hospital, Heidelberg, Australia
Dementia Collaborative Research Centre, School of Psychiatry, UNSW Medicine, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia Centre for Healthy Brain Ageing, School of Psychiatry, University of New South Wales, Sydney, Australia h.brodaty@unsw.edu.au.
Issue Date: 22-May-2014
Citation: The Australian and New Zealand Journal of Psychiatry 2014; 48(12): 1137-42
Abstract: To examine characteristics that predict the progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia.Of 970 patients recruited from nine memory clinics around Australia, 185 had mild cognitive impairment diagnosed. Measures of cognitive ability, functional ability, and neuropsychiatric symptoms were completed at baseline and over 3 years of follow up.Over 3 years, 52 (28%) patients with mild cognitive impairment developed dementia. Older age, lower cognitive ability at baseline, and faster decline in cognitive ability over the first 6 months of follow up, but not depression, predicted progression to dementia.The findings confirm that simple clinical data such as age, cognitive ability at baseline, and rate of cognitive decline are important predictors of progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia over 3 years.
Internal ID Number: 24852322
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12225
DOI: 10.1177/0004867414536237
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24852322
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Dementia
depression
longitudinal studies
mild cognitive impairment
risk factors
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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