Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12211
Title: Detecting cognitive impairment after concussion: sensitivity of change from baseline and normative data methods using the CogSport/Axon cognitive test battery.
Authors: Louey, Andrea G;Cromer, Jason A;Schembri, Adrian J;Darby, David G;Maruff, Paul;Makdissi, Michael;Mccrory, Paul
Affiliation: Melbourne School of Psychological Sciences, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
CogState Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia Child Study Center, Yale University, New Haven, CT, USA.
CogState Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia.
CogState Ltd., Melbourne, VIC, Australia The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre - Austin Campus, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia pmaruff@cogstate.com.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre - Austin Campus, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia Centre For Health Exercise and Sports Medicine, Melbourne Physiotherapy Department, The University of Melbourne, Parkville, VIC, Australia.
The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne Brain Centre - Austin Campus, Heidelberg, VIC, Australia.
Issue Date: 9-May-2014
Citation: Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology : the Official Journal of the National Academy of Neuropsychologists 2014; 29(5): 432-41
Abstract: Concussion-related cognitive impairments are typically evaluated with repeated neuropsychological assessments where post-injury performances are compared with pre-injury baseline data (baseline method). Many cases of concussions, however, are evaluated in the absence of baseline data by comparing post-injury performances with normative data (normative method). This study aimed to compare the sensitivity and specificity of these two methods using the CogSport/Axon test battery. Normative data and reliable change indices were computed from a non-injured athlete sample (n = 235). Test-retest data from non-injured (n = 260) and recently concussed (n = 29) athlete samples were then used to compare the two methods. The baseline method was found to be more sensitive than the normative method, and both methods had high specificity and overall correct classification rates. This suggests that while the normative method identifies most cases of recent concussions, the baseline method remains a more precise approach to assessing concussion-related cognitive impairments.
Internal ID Number: 24813184
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12211
DOI: 10.1093/arclin/acu020
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24813184
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Assessment
Cognition
Concussion
Injury management
Neuropsychological evaluation
mTBI
Adolescent
Adult
Analysis of Variance
Athletic Injuries.complications
Brain Concussion.complications
Case-Control Studies
Cognition Disorders.diagnosis.etiology
Comprehension
Diagnosis, Computer-Assisted
Humans
Male
Neuropsychological Tests.standards
Psychomotor Performance
Reaction Time
Reference Values
Reproducibility of Results
Sensitivity and Specificity
Severity of Illness Index
Young Adult
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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