Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12044
Title: Cerebral microbleeds: a review of clinical, genetic, and neuroimaging associations.
Authors: Yates, Paul A;Villemagne, Victor L;Ellis, Kathryn A;Desmond, Patricia M;Masters, Colin L;Rowe, Christopher C
Affiliation: Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health , Heidelberg, VIC , Australia ; Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia.
Department of Nuclear Medicine and Centre for PET, Austin Health , Heidelberg, VIC , Australia ; Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia ; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia.
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia ; Department of Radiology, Royal Melbourne Hospital , Parkville, VIC , Australia.
Department of Medicine, The University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia ; Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, University of Melbourne , Parkville, VIC , Australia.
Issue Date: 6-Jan-2014
Citation: Frontiers in Neurology 2014; 4(): 205
Abstract: Cerebral microbleeds (microbleeds) are small, punctuate hypointense lesions seen in T2* Gradient-Recall Echo (GRE) and Susceptibility-Weighted (SWI) Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) sequences, corresponding to areas of hemosiderin breakdown products from prior microscopic hemorrhages. They occur in the setting of impaired small vessel integrity, commonly due to either hypertensive vasculopathy or cerebral amyloid angiopathy. Microbleeds are more prevalent in individuals with Alzheimer's disease (AD) dementia and in those with both ischemic and hemorrhagic stroke. However they are also found in asymptomatic individuals, with increasing prevalence with age, particularly in carriers of the Apolipoprotein (APOE) ε4 allele. Other neuroimaging findings that have been linked with microbleeds include lacunar infarcts and white matter hyperintensities on MRI, and increased cerebral β-amyloid burden using (11)C-PiB Positron Emission Tomography. The presence of microbleeds has been suggested to confer increased risk of incident intracerebral hemorrhage - particularly in the setting of anticoagulation - and of complications of immunotherapy for AD. Prospective data regarding the natural history and sequelae of microbleeds are currently limited, however there is a growing evidence base that will serve to inform clinical decision-making in the future.
Internal ID Number: 24432010
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/12044
DOI: 10.3389/fneur.2013.00205
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24432010
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Alzheimer’s disease
MRI imaging
amyloid imaging
cerebral amyloid angiopathy
intracerebral hemorrhage
microbleeds
positron-emission tomography
stroke
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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