Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11884
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dc.contributor.authorChambers, Brian Ren
dc.contributor.authorChambers, Jayneen
dc.contributor.authorChurilov, Leoniden
dc.contributor.authorCameron, Heatheren
dc.contributor.authorMacdonell, Richard A Len
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:30:55Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:30:55Z
dc.date.issued2013-09-24en
dc.identifier.citationPhlebology / Venous Forum of the Royal Society of Medicine 2013; 29(8): 528-35en
dc.identifier.govdoc24065289en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11884en
dc.description.abstractWe evaluated internal jugular vein and vertebral vein volume flow using ultrasound, in patients with clinically isolated syndrome or mild multiple sclerosis and controls, to determine whether volume flow was different between the two groups.In patients and controls, internal jugular vein volume flow increased from superior to inferior segments, consistent with recruitment from collateral veins. Internal jugular vein and vertebral vein volume flow were greater on the right in supine and sitting positions. Internal jugular vein volume flow was higher in the supine posture. Vertebral vein volume flow was higher in the sitting posture. Regression analyses of cube root transformed volume flow data, adjusted for supine/sitting, right/left and internal jugular vein/vertebral vein, revealed no significant difference in volume flow in patients compared to controls.Our findings further refute the concept of venous obstruction as a causal factor in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis. Control volume flow data may provide useful normative reference values.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherChronic cerebrospinal venous insufficiencyen
dc.subject.othermultiple sclerosisen
dc.subject.othervenous ultrasounden
dc.subject.othervolume flowen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAngiographyen
dc.subject.otherBlood Flow Velocityen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherJugular Veins.physiopathology.ultrasonographyen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherMultiple Sclerosis.physiopathology.ultrasonographyen
dc.subject.otherSpine.blood supply.physiopathology.ultrasonographyen
dc.titleInternal jugular and vertebral vein volume flow in patients with clinically isolated syndrome or mild multiple sclerosis and healthy controls: results from a prospective sonographer-blinded study.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitlePhlebology / Venous Forum of the Royal Society of Medicineen
dc.identifier.affiliationThe Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia Department of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australiaen
dc.identifier.affiliationDepartment of Neurology, Austin Health, Melbourne, Australia The Florey Institute of Neuroscience and Mental Health, Melbourne, Australia Department of Medicine, University of Melbourne, Victoria, Australia brc@bigpond.net.au.en
dc.identifier.doi10.1177/0268355513505505en
dc.description.pages528-35en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/24065289en
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