Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11814
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dc.contributor.authorTamplin, Jeanetteen
dc.contributor.authorBaker, Felicity Aen
dc.contributor.authorJones, Bronwenen
dc.contributor.authorWay, Anneliisen
dc.contributor.authorLee, Stuarten
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T01:26:33Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T01:26:33Z
dc.date.issued2013en
dc.identifier.citationNeurorehabilitation; 32(4): 929-41en
dc.identifier.govdoc23867418en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11814en
dc.description.abstractCommunication deficits resulting from aphasia can negatively impact stroke survivors' relationships and social participation. Despite their difficulties, singing is accessible and enjoyable for many people with aphasia.To explore the effects of group singing for people with aphasia.A community choir was established and facilitated by a neurologic music therapist. Mood (General Health Questionnaire-12; Visual Analogue Mood Scale), communication, cognition and global functioning (Stroke Impact Scale-3) and social functioning (Sense of Belonging Instrument) were measured before, and at 12-weeks and 20-weeks after joining the choir. Three choir members and five caregivers also completed semi-structured interviews about their experience of the choir.Baselines measures were collected for 13 participants with aphasia. Prior to joining the choir, participants had higher levels of negative mood symptoms and poorer subjective sense of belonging compared to Australian general population samples. Results from the GHQ-12 suggested a trend towards reduction of psychological distress after participating in the choir. Thematic analysis of the interviews revealed five common themes: increased confidence, peer support, enhanced mood, increased motivation, and changes to communication.The strength of findings was limited by the number of participants and lack of a control group, however clear benefits of choir participation were demonstrated. Preliminary findings were encouraging and warrant further rigorous investigation.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAdulten
dc.subject.otherAffect.physiologyen
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.otherAphasia.etiology.physiopathology.psychology.therapyen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherMusic Therapyen
dc.subject.otherResidence Characteristicsen
dc.subject.otherSingingen
dc.subject.otherSocial Behavioren
dc.subject.otherSpeech Therapyen
dc.subject.otherStroke.complicationsen
dc.title'Stroke a Chord': the effect of singing in a community choir on mood and social engagement for people living with aphasia following a stroke.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleNeuroRehabilitationen
dc.identifier.affiliationAustin Health, Melbourne, VIC, Australia. jeanette.tamplin@austin.org.auen
dc.identifier.doi10.3233/NRE-130916en
dc.description.pages929-41en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23867418en
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