Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11322
Title: Epidemiology and structural basis of racial differences in fragility fractures in Chinese and Caucasians.
Authors: Wang, X-F;Seeman, Ego
Affiliation: Endocrine Centre, Austin Health, the University of Melbourne, PO Box 5444, West Heidelberg, 3081 Melbourne, Australia. wang5@unimelb.edu.au
Issue Date: 19-Aug-2011
Citation: Osteoporosis International : A Journal Established As Result of Cooperation Between the European Foundation For Osteoporosis and the National Osteoporosis Foundation of The Usa 2011; 23(2): 411-22
Abstract: Chinese have similar vertebral fracture prevalence but lower incidence of hip and distal forearm fractures than in Caucasians. The underlying structural and biomechanical basis of racial differences in bone fragility is still largely undefined but Chinese assemble their smaller appendicular skeleton with thicker cortices and trabeculae compared with Caucasians. Vertebral fracture prevalence is similar by race, but the incidence of hip and distal forearm fractures is lower in Chinese than in Caucasians. This racial dimorphism cannot be explained by differences in areal bone mineral density (aBMD) as aBMD is lower in Chinese mainly due to their smaller size. The underlying structural and biomechanical basis of racial differences in bone fragility is still largely undefined but Chinese assemble their smaller appendicular skeleton with more mineralised bone matrix within it; the cortices are thicker and perhaps less porous while trabeculae are fewer but thicker and more connected. This configuration produces a bone with a lower surface/volume ratio, which in turn reduces the surface available for remodelling to occur upon so that the lower surface/volume ratio may make the bone less exposed to remodelling and the thicker cortices and trabeculae less vulnerable to remodelling when it does occur during advancing age. However, prospective studies are needed to define racial differences at the age of onset, rate of bone loss from the intracortical, endocortical and trabecular components of the endosteal envelope and bone formation upon the periosteal envelope; notions of bone 'loss' are derived mainly from cross-sectional studies. Studies of the site- and surface-specific changes in bone modelling and remodelling are needed to better define racial differences in bone fragility in old age.
Internal ID Number: 21853371
URI: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/11322
DOI: 10.1007/s00198-011-1739-2
URL: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21853371
Type: Journal Article
Subjects: Asian Continental Ancestry Group.statistics & numerical data
Bone Density.ethics.physiology
Bone Development.physiology
European Continental Ancestry Group.statistics & numerical data
Hip Fractures.ethnology.physiopathology
Humans
Osteoporotic Fractures.ethnology.pathology.physiopathology
Spinal Fractures.ethnology.physiopathology
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

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