Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10933
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dc.contributor.authorEastwood, Glenn Men
dc.contributor.authorO'Connell, Beven
dc.contributor.authorConsidine, Julieen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T00:30:38Z-
dc.date.available2015-05-16T00:30:38Z-
dc.date.issued2009-12-01en
dc.identifier.citationCritical Care and Resuscitation; 11(4): 238-43en
dc.identifier.govdoc20001870en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10933en
dc.description.abstractTo describe how intensive care nurses manage the administration of supplemental oxygen to patients during the first 24 hours after cardiac surgery.A retrospective audit was conducted of the medical records of 245 adult patients who underwent cardiac surgery between 1 January 2005 and 31 May 2008 in an Australian metropolitan hospital. Physiological data (oxygen saturation measured by pulse oximetry and respiratory rate) and intensive care unit management data (oxygen delivery device, oxygen flow rate and duration of mechanical ventilation) were collected at hourly intervals over the first 24 hours of ICU care.Of the 245 patients whose records were audited, 185 were male; mean age was 70 years (SD, 10), and mean APACHE II score was 17.5 (SD, 5.14). Almost half the patients (122, 49.8%) were extubated within 8 hours of ICU admission. The most common oxygen delivery device used immediately after extubation was the simple face mask (214 patients, 87%). Following extubation, patients received supplemental oxygen via, on average, two different delivery devices (range, 1-3), and had the delivery device changed an average of 1.38 times (range, 0-6) during the 24 hours studied. Twenty-two patients (9%) received non-invasive ventilation or high-flow oxygen therapy, and 16 (7%) experienced one or more episode of hypoxaemia during mechanical ventilation. A total of 148 patients (60%) experienced one or more episodes of low oxygenation or abnormal respiratory rate during the first 24 hours of ICU care despite receiving supplemental oxygen.These findings suggest that the ICU environment does not protect cardiac surgical patients from suboptimal oxygen delivery, and highlights the need for strategies to prompt the early initiation of interventions aimed at optimising blood oxygen levels in cardiac surgical patients in the ICU.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAgeden
dc.subject.otherAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.otherAnoxia.nursingen
dc.subject.otherCardiac Surgical Proceduresen
dc.subject.otherFemaleen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherIntensive Care Unitsen
dc.subject.otherMaleen
dc.subject.otherMedical Auditen
dc.subject.otherMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.otherOximetryen
dc.subject.otherOxygen Inhalation Therapy.methods.utilizationen
dc.subject.otherRespiration Disorders.nursingen
dc.subject.otherRespiration, Artificial.methods.utilizationen
dc.titleOxygen delivery to patients after cardiac surgery: a medical record audit.en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleCritical Care and Resuscitationen
dc.identifier.affiliationIntensive Care Unit, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.description.pages238-43en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/20001870en
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