Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10684
Full metadata record
DC FieldValueLanguage
dc.contributor.authorAngus, Peter Wen
dc.contributor.authorPatterson, Scott Jen
dc.date.accessioned2015-05-16T00:12:57Z
dc.date.available2015-05-16T00:12:57Z
dc.date.issued2008-10-01en
dc.identifier.citationLiver Transplantation : Official Publication of the American Association For the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Society; 14 Suppl 2(): S15-22en
dc.identifier.govdoc18825721en
dc.identifier.otherPUBMEDen
dc.identifier.urihttp://ahro.austin.org.au/austinjspui/handle/1/10684en
dc.description.abstract1. Prophylaxis using the combination of lamivudine and high-dose intravenous hepatitis B immunoglobulin (approximately 10,000 IU monthly) reduces the long-term risk of recurrence of hepatitis B in hepatitis B surface antigen-positive transplant recipients to 5% to 10%. However, this therapy is expensive and inconvenient for patients. 2. Recent studies have shown that similar results can be obtained, at far less cost, with much lower doses of intramuscular hepatitis B immune globulin (400-800 IU monthly) in combination with pretransplant and posttransplant lamivudine therapy. 3. The development of lamivudine resistance pre-transplant can lead to hepatic decompensation and increases the risk of posttransplant recurrence in patients receiving hepatitis B immune globulin/lamivudine prophylaxis. Newer nucleos(t)ide analogues with lower resistance rates such as entecavir, adefovir, and tenofovir should therefore replace lamivudine in hepatitis B prophylaxis. 4. Combination therapy with these newer agents and low-dose intramuscular hepatitis B immune globulin is likely to be the most cost effective hepatitis B immune globulin-containing regimen for the prevention of hepatitis B recurrence post-transplant. 5. Some form of hepatitis B virus prophylaxis needs be continued indefinitely post-transplant. However, the use of antivirals with very low rates of drug resistance will make it possible to stop hepatitis B immune globulin therapy in many patients currently receiving hepatitis B immune globulin/nucleos(t)ide combination therapy.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.subject.otherAntiviral Agents.administration & dosageen
dc.subject.otherDrug Therapy, Combinationen
dc.subject.otherHepatitis B.drug therapy.surgeryen
dc.subject.otherHumansen
dc.subject.otherImmunoglobulins, Intravenous.administration & dosageen
dc.subject.otherInjections, Intramuscularen
dc.subject.otherLamivudine.administration & dosageen
dc.subject.otherLiver Transplantationen
dc.titleLiver transplantation for hepatitis B: what is the best hepatitis B immune globulin/antiviral regimen?en
dc.typeJournal Articleen
dc.identifier.journaltitleLiver transplantation : official publication of the American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases and the International Liver Transplantation Societyen
dc.identifier.affiliationpeter.angus@austin.org.auen
dc.identifier.affiliationVictorian Liver Transplant Unit, Austin Health, Heidelberg, Victoria, Australiaen
dc.identifier.doi10.1002/lt.21614en
dc.description.pagesS15-22en
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/18825721en
Appears in Collections:Journal articles

Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.


Items in AHRO are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.